By Lockman & Lubell Pediatric Associates
January 03, 2018
Category: Pediatric Care
You might think that your child can’t develop tooth decay when their teeth have not grown in yet, but they can. Tooth decay in infants and very young children is often referred to as baby bottle tooth decay and it is easily preventable. Baby bottle tooth decay occurs when sweetened liquids or those with natural sugars--including milk, formula and fruit juice--cling to an infant’s teeth for a long time. 
 
The bacteria in the mouth thrive on this sugar and make acids that attack the teeth. Children that are at risk include those whose pacifiers are frequently dipped in sugar or syrup. And if you give your infant a sugary drink at nap time or nighttime, it is even more harmful, as the flow of saliva decreases during sleep. By talking to your pediatrician, you can easily prevent baby bottle tooth decay from developing. 

Tips from Your Pediatrician for Prevention

A few simple steps can help stave off baby bottle tooth decay. In addition to maintaining good oral hygiene at an early age, you can also:
  • Wipe your baby’s gums with clean a gauze pad or washcloth after each feeding.
  • Begin brushing your child’s teeth (without toothpaste), when his or her first tooth comes in.
  • Clean and massage gums in areas without teeth.
  • Floss once all the baby teeth have come in.
  • Ensure your child is receiving enough fluoride.
  • Schedule regular dental visits by your child’s first birthday.
Talk to your pediatrician for more information about how to protect your child from baby bottle tooth decay. Remember, your child’s oral health also affects their general health, so speak with your pediatrician for more information to protect your baby from harm.
By Lockman & Lubell Pediatric Associates
December 01, 2017
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Vaccinations   Immunizations  

VaccinationsDespite all of the research supporting the effectiveness of immunizations, many parents still question the safety of vaccines for their little ones. Will they protect my infant from serious disease? Or are the vaccines themselves harmful?

Immunization is one of the best ways parents can protect their babies from serious childhood diseases ranging from tetanus and mumps to whooping cough and seasonal flu—and have been for more than 50 years. In fact, vaccinations have reduced the number of infections from vaccine-preventable diseases by more than 90%!

Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that every child receive the protection that immunization provides.

Do vaccines even work?

Yes, vaccines work every year to protect millions of children from serious illnesses. Because infants are particularly vulnerable to infectious diseases, if an unvaccinated baby is exposed to a certain germ, the baby’s body may not be strong enough to fight the disease. Therefore it is very important that parents take the necessary steps to ward off harmful complications through immunization.

Are there side effects?

As with any medication, side effects can occur with vaccines. These side effects are usually very minor and include redness or tenderness at the injection site or a low fever, which indicates that the body is reacting positively to the vaccine. Most babies do not experience any side effects from vaccines, and severe reactions are very rare.

Parents have the power to protect their baby from serious illnesses. Deciding not to vaccinate your child could put him at risk for life-threatening childhood diseases. If you have questions about immunization, talk with your pediatrician. You can also visit the sites listed below for additional information and updated immunization schedules.

 

American Academy of Pediatrics

www.cispimmunize.org

Food and Drug Administration
www.fda.gov

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
www.cdc.gov/vaccines

National Network for Immunization Information
www.immunizationinfo.org

By Lockman & Lubell Pediatric Associates
November 03, 2017
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Baby Care   Infants   Colic  
All babies cry, it is their way of telling you that they’re hungry, wet, or tired. However, if your baby has colic, they may cry all the time. So how can you tell the difference between your baby’s normal tears and colic? 
 
Colic is a term used to describe uncontrollable crying in an otherwise healthy baby. If your baby is younger than 5 months old and cries for more than three hours in a row on three or more days a week for at least three weeks, chances are they are colicky. Colic is not a disease and won’t cause your baby any long-term harm, but it is tough to go through for both babies and their parents. By visiting your pediatrician, you can determine the best way to handle your colicky baby. 

Your Pediatrician Shares the Symptoms

When a baby is around two or three weeks old, colic most often shows up at this time. While babies normally cry to let you know when they are wet, hungry, frightened or tired, a baby with colic cries inconsolably and excessively—often at the same time of day. This can frequently occur in the late afternoon or evening.
 
If your baby has colic, their belly may also look enlarged. You may also notice that they alternately extend or pull up their legs and passes gas as they cry.  
 
Other symptoms of a baby that is otherwise healthy and well-fed include:
  • Predictable crying episodes. 
  • Intense or inconsolable crying. 
  • Posture changes. 

When to Visit Your Pediatrician

It is important to seek immediate medical attention if your baby’s crying could be the result of a fall or injury. Please call our pediatrician if you baby stops gaining weight or begins to lose weight.  Also, please call our office if your baby:
  • Can’t be soothed, even for a few minutes
  • Doesn’t suck strongly at the bottle or breast
  • Doesn’t like to be held or touched
  • Has an unusual-sounding cry, or sounds like they are in pain
  • Has diarrhea or blood in the stool
  • Has trouble breathing
  • Is less alert or sleepier than usual
  • Is eating less than usual
  • Is running a fever of 100.4 degrees or more
  • Is throwing up
We understand that a colicky baby can take a lot out of your day, but, as your pediatrician, we are available to help you better care for your colicky baby.  
By Lockman & Lubell Pediatric Associates
September 27, 2017
Category: Health Care
Tags: Pets  

Raising your children with pets provides a great opportunity for learning, nurturing, and building healthy relationship skills that will benefit your children and petschildren for the rest of their lives. With help from your pediatrician, you can better understand the benefits of having a pet in your home as your child grows up. 

Children that are raised with pets show many benefits. Developing positive feelings about pets can contribute to a child’s self-esteem and self-confidence. Positive relationships with pets can also aid in the development of trusting relationships with others. Additionally, a good relationship with a pet can also help non-verbal communication, compassion and empathy.  
 
According to your pediatrician, pets can serve different purposes for children, such as:
  • Safe recipients of secrets and private thoughts
  • Providing lessons about life
  • Developing responsible behavior in children who care for them
  • Providing a connection to nature
  • Teaching respect for other living things
Having a pet can also provide other physical and emotional needs, including physical activity, comfort contact, love, loyalty, affection and the experience with loss if a pet is lost or dies.  
 
By visiting your child’s pediatrician, you can better understand the benefits of having pets in your home as your child grows. Your pediatrician can also offer advice for allergies and other illnesses in relation to pets. 
By Lockman & Lubell Pediatric Associates
May 11, 2017
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: Baby Care   Infants   Teething  

Baby TeethingTeething is an important part of your baby’s development. Although it can be an irritable time for your baby, there are many ways you can help ease the pain. Most babies get their first teeth around 6 months, but they might come anytime between 2 and 12 months of age. Teething does not cause a high fever or vomiting and diarrhea, so if your baby does develop these symptoms, it is important that you contact your pediatrician immediately. 

Helping Ease the Pain

When your baby is teething, all you want to do is help ease the pain. Your pediatrician offers a few tips to keep in mind when your baby is teething:

  • Wipe your baby’s face often with a cloth to remove drool and prevent rashes from developing.
  • Give your baby something to chew on, but make sure it is big enough so that it can’t be swallowed and that it can’t break into small pieces. Teething rings are a popular choice for babies to chew on, as well as plush toys that are crunchy on the inside.
  • Rub your baby’s gums with a clean finger.
  • Never tie a teething ring around your baby’s neck, as it could get caught on something.
  • If your baby seems irritable, ask your pediatrician if it is okay to give your baby a dose of acetaminophen or ibuprofen to ease discomfort.

Cleaning Your Baby’s New Teeth

Once your baby’s new teeth have arrived, they are susceptible to plaque buildup just like adult teeth, which can lead to discoloration and dental complications. However, do no use toothpaste on your child’s teeth until they are old enough to spit—around the age of 2 or 3. Until then, brush their teeth with a small, soft toothbrush and water. The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends that kids visit the dentist by age 1, when six to eight teeth are in place, in order to spot any potential problems and advise you about proper preventive care. 

By visiting your pediatrician, you can establish proper care for your child. Your pediatrician can help guide you in caring for your child through teething so that they are more comfortable.





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